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Thursday, June 29, 2017

 
 
 

 
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Posts Tagged ‘attendant care’

Attendant Not Required to Provide Academic Records to AB Insurer

An arbitrator at the Financial Services Commission of Ontario (FSCO) has ruled that a person providing attendant care for an insured is not required to provide their academic records to the accident benefits insurer.

In Mary Anthonipillai and Security National Insurance Co./Monnex Insurance Mgmt. Inc. [FSCO A11-001168] the daughter of the claimant, Mary Athonipillai, was providing housekeeping and attendant care services for her mother while she was attending university.  The insurer, Security National, requested a copy of the daughter’s academic records because it took the position that the amount of attendant care and housekeeping services provided seemed excessive if the daughter was attending school at the same time.  It was unknown if she was a part-time or full-time student and the daughter ignored all requests from the insurer for this information.  Security National believed that the lack of this information was prohibitive to any meaningful settlement discussions.

Arbitrator Jessica Kowalski stated,

I am not persuaded that the records are so relevant that their non-disclosure now would prejudice a just and fair hearing so that I should therefore set aside privacy concerns around documents that contain information personal to a third party but none about a party to this proceeding.
Nor am I persuaded that the academic schedule is as probative as Security National asserts. That schedule will not disclose how often, or even whether, Ms. George attended her classes.
For these reasons, the motion is dismissed.

Amount of Attendant Care Payable is NOT Limited to the Extent of the Economic Loss Suffered

A recent decision delivered by Justice Ray in Henry v. Gore Mutual Insurance Company, 2012 ONSC 3687, found that an automobile insurer must pay an insured the full amount of attendant care benefits as set out in the Form 1 and is not entitled to take a proportional approach to the payment of this benefit. Gore Mutual Insurance argued that its liability for attendant care benefits was limited to the number of hours that the attendant care provider lost from work. Justice Ray did not agree with this approach and stated that a plain reading of the relevant section must be followed. In the decision, Justice Ray stated the following:

A plain reading of the section provides that if a family member stays home from work, loses income in order to provide all reasonable and necessary attendant care to the insured – and the insured is obligated to pay, promises to pay or does pay the family member, then the definition in section 19(1) has been met. All reasonable and necessary attendant care expenses must then be paid to the insured as described in the Form 1.

The decision can be read in its entirety here: Henry v Gore Mutual Insurance Company, 2012 ONSC 3687

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